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Saskatchewan Crime Watch Advisory – Fraudulent attempts to rent properties for sale

Mon, 19 Aug by Pauline Relkey

This applies to anyone that has a property for rent or for sale and also for people looking to rent. Home owners, google your property address regularly and look for false ads. If you find any, contact your local police or RCMP. Renters, google the rental address you are inquiring about to see if it is listed for sale also. If so, contact the realtor to see if this is a false rental ad.

The following advisory went out this past weekend:

This is a message from the RCMP Saskatchewan Crime Watch Advisory Network.

Fraudulent attempts to rent sale properties – Yorkton RCMP file # 20191183436.

It has been brought to the attention of the Yorkton RCMP that culprits have tried to secure damage and rental deposits for sale properties which are not theirs.

This is a reminder to exercise caution when replying to ads for rental properties. Ensure you speak directly with the REALTOR® or homeowner. Do not e-transfer, wire or mail any money if you can not verify the property representative’s identity and information.

Thank you.

If you have information related to this advisory please call 9 1 1 or 310-RCMP.

To sign up please go to www.saskcrimewatch.ca.

Keep Your Kids Safe

Wed, 05 Jun by Pauline Relkey

I think that this information is very important for everyone to think about.

For Immediate Release
June 5, 2019
Hudson Bay, SK – Cade Sprackman Safety Day in Hudson Bay

Today, the Saskatchewan Safety Council is hosting the second annual ‘Cade Sprackman Safety Day’ at Hudson Bay Community School.
Students participating in this one-day event have previously completed online safety education through the Career Safety Education program and will further expand their knowledge by learning about Fall Protection and Fire Safety from the Saskatchewan Safety Council, Lockout and Control of Hazardous Energy with Weyerhaeuser, and Eye Protection, Ladder Safety, Hazard Recognition and Head Protection from Saskatchewan Construction Safety Association (SCSA). As an additional sponsorship, Weyerhaeuser will also provide a BBQ lunch for the entire Hudson Bay Community School.

On January 27th, 2015, Cade Sprackman was killed at his workplace. Michelle, Cade’s mom, said, “I remember him and I talking about what sort of work he would be doing. I asked him about safety and he assured me it was safe. I will never forget the night the RCMP came to the door with news that Cade had died. All they could tell me was that it was an industrial accident that had happened at work. They knew no details.”

Michelle has advocated for youth safety in the workplace and supports Career Safety Education for youth. “Career safety education is so vitally important. Cade naively saw his workplace as safe as he had nothing to compare it to. His employer told him it was safe and so he believed it. We all think that someone has our back; that systems are in place to keep us safe. Systems are only as good as the people behind them and people are fallible. Just like we have to be defensive drivers today, we have to be defensive on the worksite as well.”

Cade, who was raised and educated in Hudson Bay, was creative and imaginative and loved the arts as well as gaming and cinema. He aspired one day to work in the arts as a cinema director.

A video on Cade’s story can be viewed on YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDP-Ca7-LWI&feature=youtu.be

Career Safety Education encourages the development of awareness, attitudes and habits which result in a culture of safety affecting both workplace and home life. Career Safety Education is the first program of its kind in North America, providing universal access to safety training to all youth in Saskatchewan. Thanks to generous partners, the training is completely FREE for youth between 14 and 21 years of age.

Career Safety Education is comprised of Young Worker’s Readiness Certificate Course (YWRCC), Mental Health – Wellness Strategies, Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS), and an elective from the following: Agriculture: Online Agriculture Training System (OATS), Heavy Construction Roadbuilders: Roadbuilders Safety Training System (RSTS), Trades and Building Construction: Safety Construction Orientation Training (SCOT), and Healthcare: Workplace Assessment and Violence Education (WAVE).

Amanda LePine, Community Relations Coordinator, at the Saskatchewan Safety Council is grateful that the Sprackman Family is sharing their story. She comments that “Cade Sprackman had a vision and dreams to do what he loved. Parents, youth and employers need to hear his story and work to promote safety for youth while at work. We are honoured to be a part of the Cade Sprackman Safety Day and thankful for the support of partners and sponsors. Hopefully hearing Cade’s story will help to prevent youth injuries and fatalities in the workplace.”

The Cade Sprackman Safety Day is an annual event. To be involved, contact Amanda LePine at 306-757-3197.

Cade Sprackman Safety Day Schedule

9:00 AM: Weyerhaeuser – Presentation to Hudson Bay Community School
9:25 AM: Opening Remarks – Saskatchewan Safety Council
9:45 AM: Fall Protection – with demonstration – Saskatchewan Safety Council
10:20 AM: Lockout and Control of Hazardous Energy – Weyerhaeuser
11:10 AM: Break
11:15 AM: Eye Protection / Ladder Safety / Hazard Recognition – SCS
12:16 PM: Lunch Break – BBQ Sponsored by Weyerhaeuser
1:10 PM: Fire Safety with short Intro to Fire Extinguishers – Saskatchewan Safety Council
2:10 PM: Break
2:20 PM: Head Protection Presentation – SCSA
3:05 PM: Thank You and Closing Remarks

ABOUT THE SASKATCHEWAN SAFETY COUNCIL
Since 1955, the Saskatchewan Safety Council, a non-profit registered charity, has been dedicated to the prevention of injury in Saskatchewan . . . at home, at play, and at work.
Funded through donations, membership contributions, sponsorships, grants, and the distribution of its safety programs and materials, the revenues generated by the Safety Council are invested within the province of Saskatchewan to further promote safety.
MEDIA CONTACT:
Amanda LePine
Community Relations Coordinator
Saskatchewan Safety Council
445 Hoffer Drive, Regina SK
alepine@sasksafety.org
306-757-3197
The Saskatchewan Safety Council is a registered charity.
Charitable Registration #11914-0382-RR
www.sasksafety.org | 1.855.280.7115

Sask Power Outages

Mon, 30 Apr by Pauline Relkey

Are you wondering if your area will have a planned outage soon? Check Sask Power’s website to plan ahead. Click here.

When an Outage Occurs

  • Step 1: Determine if the power failure is limited to your home

    • If your neighbours have power, check your electrical panel to see if the main circuit breaker has tripped. Even if it appears to be on, turn the breaker off and back on again to ensure a good connection.

    Step 2: If your electrical panel or main breaker isn’t the cause of the outage, call 310-2220.

    • Turn off or unplug any appliances, computers or electronics you were using when the power went out. Leave one light on so you’ll know when your power returns.
    • Keep refrigerators and freezers closed. If the power is out for a long time, make sure you check all refrigerated and frozen food before you eat it.
    • Close all doors, windows and drapes to conserve heat (unless the sun is shining in).
    • Never light a fire indoors unless you’re using an approved fire place or wood stove.
    • When faced with multiple outages, Sask Power prioritizes as follows:

      1. Life threatening or hazardous situations like power lines that have fallen on a road or vehicle.
      2. Large outages — Main lines and major equipment that return power to the largest number of customers.
      3. Small, isolated outages — Secondary lines and neighbourhood equipment.

When the Power Is Restored

They restore power when repairs are complete. If your neighbour’s power has returned and yours has not, there could be a problem specific to your home. Recheck your main breaker and reset it even if it appears to be on.

Occasionally, the power goes out again; this is sometimes the sign of another unidentified problem. Make sure to call us every time the power goes out (after you’ve checked your own main breaker). If power is not restored, call us toll-free at 310-2220.

Some Basic garbage and recycling hints

Mon, 09 Apr by Pauline Relkey

This is a Facebook link to City of Regina. Very basic and kind of funny. Seems like they are teaching us how to tie our shoes. Click on the volume button bottom right to hear what they are saying.

Cart Instructions

Waste Wednesday:Watch John as he learns the four easy steps to using his recycling and garbage carts.Learn more at Regina.ca/waste

Posted by City of Regina | Municipal Government on Wednesday, April 5, 2017

I saved 2 lives!!

Wed, 07 Feb by Pauline Relkey

Yes, believe it or not this really happened to me. Here is my real life story.

A couple months ago, I was going to pick up an item I had agreed to purchase on Varagesale. Varagesale is an app that connects with Facebook and enables you to buy and sell stuff locally.

As I was walking up the outside stairs of this house, I thought I could detect a natural gas smell which usually means there is a leak nearby. It could come from a gas furnace or gas fireplace or gas appliances, etc. The mother of the girl who was selling the item answered the door and when I told her why I was there, she said she would get her daughter. I told this lady that I could smell gas and she should probably call our local gas company and have them come out and check. There is no cost for this and it’s for safety reasons. The lady either didn’t seem to really care or wasn’t comprehending what I was saying when I told her this. The daughter came out and we exchanged money and the shirt that I was buying and I left.

When I got back into my vehicle, I thought about what just happened and got the impression that the lady would not place the call so I took it upon myself to call the gas company. The person that answered my call was a bit surprised that I was calling about someone else’s property and not my own. But I explained to her that I am a Realtor and have smelt this a few times before when I had gone into properties and recognized this smell again. So this lady said they would look into this situation.

Very shortly after, I received a phone call from one of the employees of this gas company who said that he was outside this property and got a reading of 2 which he said was very high to get outside and it meant that the whole house was full of gas. He said that the people inside weren’t answering the door when they knocked and he didn’t even want to call them on the phone because that could set off an explosion. So I went back on Varagesale and messaged this person to answer her door and to get out of the house immediately as there was a gas leak and it was dangerous to be there.

She did message me later to say thanks. The gas employee also told me that I basically saved their lives by calling in the gas leak. I was both happy that no one was hurt and freaked out that something like this could have ended up in a tragedy.

So there, to all my friends and family that critique my use of Varagesale.  By using Varagesale, I saved 2 lives!

PS How do you detect a leak? Follow your senses!

Use your NOSE
SaskEnergy adds an odour to natural gas so you will quickly know if there’s a problem. If you smell an odour that is similar to skunk or rotten eggs, there may be a natural gas leak.

Use your EYES
You cannot see natural gas, however if you SEE a vapour, ground frosting, or a significant area of brown vegetation, that could be an indication of a natural gas leak. As well, if you SEE continuous bubbling of wet or flooded areas, or dust blowing from a hole in the ground during drier conditions, there may be a natural gas leak.

Use your EARS
If you HEAR a high-pitched hissing or roaring noise, there may be a natural gas leak.

TAKE ACTION!
If you suspect a leak indoors or outdoors:

  • Leave the home or area immediately
  • DO NOT use any electrical switches, appliances, telephones, motor vehicles, or any other sources of ignition such as lighters
    or matches
  • Call SaskEnergy’s 24-hour emergency line from a safe place
    1-888-7000-GAS (427)
  • DO NOT assume that the issue has already been reported or
    that someone else will call.

$25 Gas Detector Rebate

The most common way to detect a natural gas leak is using your sense of smell. The use of a gas detector is an additional and/or alternative safety measure for detecting a natural gas leak.

  • Most gas detectors also detect carbon monoxide. These detectors are appropriate for your home.
  • You may want to consider purchasing a second gas detector for your garage, keeping in mind that a carbon monoxide detector is not appropriate for a garage.
  • Smoke detectors do not detect natural gas.

If the warning alarm on your gas detector goes off, be sure to follow the same precautionary steps as indicated above – leave the area immediately and phone 1-888-7000-GAS (427).

Gas Detector Rebate Form

Gas Detector Rebate – Questions & Answers

How will SaskEnergy respond?

In the event of a natural gas emergency, SaskEnergy and local community response teams will:

  • Respond to the suspected site immediately
  • Assess the source of the problem and ensure the site is cleared of anyone whose safety may be at risk
  • Communicate and advise customers regarding a resolution plan

Safety Checklist

Wed, 09 Nov by Pauline Relkey

With winter soon approaching (at least not today with temps of 19 degrees), we might have a little more time to think about safety features in our homes.

Smoke detectors

Whether it is law or not, there should be smoke detectors in every building. Does every floor have a smoke detector? Are there additional ones in sleeping areas? Test the detectors regularly. Change batteries twice a year.

Carbon monoxide detectors

Do you have at least one carbon monoxide detector in your home? Test the detectors regularly.  Change batteries twice a year.

Home security

Do you have solid locks on doors and windows?   Outdoor light sensors?  Timed indoor lights?  Installed home alarm system?

Fire extinguishers

Its always a good idea to have 1 or 2 fire extinguishers in the home.  Have one in the kitchen (especially when I try to cook). Have another in the garage. Does everyone in the household know how to use them? Are they functional? Are they expired?

Safety education

Teach your family about the importance of home security and fire safety. Ensure they know how to use preventative safety equipment. Do they know how to call 911 in case of an emergency? Design and review an escape plan for all potential situations. If you live in a 2 storey home, do you have a collapsible ladder nearby?

fire-extinguisher

Get rid of your Hazardous Waste

Tue, 21 Jun by Pauline Relkey

The City of Regina has special days to bring your household hazardous waste.

Click here to see the list of what is considered hazardous.

The next 2 days to drop off this waste in Regina are Saturday, June 25 and Sat Oct 1 from 9 a.m. to 3:45 p.m.  Drop off is at the City’s Public Works Yard at 2425-4th Avenue (entrance is on 4th Avenue, half a block east off Albert Street).

hazardous waste

Realtors call for registry of grow ops, meth labs

Wed, 18 May by Pauline Relkey

Leader Post May 17, 2016
Our provincial association, ASR – the Association of Saskatchewan Realtors, is asking for a registry of former marijuana grow ops and meth labs so that agents and their buyers can be aware of these places.

There could be damage or the buyers could have other inspections done that would eliminate any or most of their concerns.

Moldy drywall and insulation because of moisture intensive growing practices are the most common problems from grow ops. Electrical systems that are rigged and chemical damage are other issues that could be there.

This information is currently held by the RCMP and the municipal police but not available to real estate agents or the general public.  No exact number of former grow ops is known but estimates are at 200+.

For the complete article, click here.

grow op

Some Days I Dislike my Job

Wed, 13 Apr by Pauline Relkey

And it’s probably not what you think.

See below the note we just received from our local real estate association.

MEMBER CAUTION Apr 13/16

The Association of Regina REALTORS® Inc. has received notice from a number of members regarding a potential buyer by the name of Greg. Members report that when speaking with this individual his behaviour is erratic and unpredictable. He has reportedly contacted multiple members asking them to show him properties. The ARR would like to remind members to always exercise safe business practises when working with potential new clients. For more information regarding REALTOR® safety, members can view CREA’s resources here.

It’s a sad day when people have to be careful when working at their job. I know that police officers, firefighters, etc. have more risks that real estate agents, but it’s sad that more and more occupations face these situations in their every day lives.

Be safe.

stop crime

Get your Home Ready for Winter

Tue, 13 Oct by Pauline Relkey

Pay a little attention to your home and garden while the days are still enjoyable to ensure that your family is ready for winter weather.

Clean up, cover up and winterize are the keys to inside and outside weatherproofing.

Here are a few suggestions for your to-do list:

Love the leaves
Lose the mentality that fallen leaves are nothing but a nuisance involving hours of raking and bagging. Have a garden? Spread the leaves over the soil so the worms can work their fertilizer magic. Mound them under shrubs and trees for additional winter root insulation.

Protect a tree
Wrap newly planted shrubs and trees with burlap to protect them from the harsh elements and the drying winter sun and wind.

Inspect eaves troughs
Once most of fall’s leaves are down, give gutters and eaves troughs a thorough cleaning to prevent water and ice build-up.

Look forward to spring

Planting spring bulbs in the garden now will ensure a riot of floral colour pops out of the ground come the spring. Bulbs can be planted right up until the ground freezes.

Hire a chimney sweep
Fireplaces are cozy and cost efficient. Wood burning fireplaces, require annual maintenance. Hire a professional to clean and inspect fireplaces, dampers and chimneys.

Furnace and ducts cleaned
Before turning on the furnace call the professionals to clean and inspect it. Furnace filters should be changed every couple of months so keep a stockpile of them handy. Have your home’s heating ducts cleaned to ensure optimal air and heat flow.

Find and Stop those Drafts
Button up the hatches and keep the chill out by inspecting windows and doors for drafts. Replace old and rotting weather-stripping around the frames to prevent heat loss and water leaks.

Enjoy winter!

raking leaves

The data included on this website is deemed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed to be accurate by the Association of Regina REALTORS® Inc.. The trademarks REALTOR®, REALTORS® and the REALTOR® logo are controlled by The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) and identify real estate professionals who are members of CREA. Used under license.