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Sask Power Outages

Mon, 30 Apr by Pauline Relkey

Are you wondering if your area will have a planned outage soon? Check Sask Power’s website to plan ahead. Click here.

When an Outage Occurs

  • Step 1: Determine if the power failure is limited to your home

    • If your neighbours have power, check your electrical panel to see if the main circuit breaker has tripped. Even if it appears to be on, turn the breaker off and back on again to ensure a good connection.

    Step 2: If your electrical panel or main breaker isn’t the cause of the outage, call 310-2220.

    • Turn off or unplug any appliances, computers or electronics you were using when the power went out. Leave one light on so you’ll know when your power returns.
    • Keep refrigerators and freezers closed. If the power is out for a long time, make sure you check all refrigerated and frozen food before you eat it.
    • Close all doors, windows and drapes to conserve heat (unless the sun is shining in).
    • Never light a fire indoors unless you’re using an approved fire place or wood stove.
    • When faced with multiple outages, Sask Power prioritizes as follows:

      1. Life threatening or hazardous situations like power lines that have fallen on a road or vehicle.
      2. Large outages — Main lines and major equipment that return power to the largest number of customers.
      3. Small, isolated outages — Secondary lines and neighbourhood equipment.

When the Power Is Restored

They restore power when repairs are complete. If your neighbour’s power has returned and yours has not, there could be a problem specific to your home. Recheck your main breaker and reset it even if it appears to be on.

Occasionally, the power goes out again; this is sometimes the sign of another unidentified problem. Make sure to call us every time the power goes out (after you’ve checked your own main breaker). If power is not restored, call us toll-free at 310-2220.

I saved 2 lives!!

Wed, 07 Feb by Pauline Relkey

Yes, believe it or not this really happened to me. Here is my real life story.

A couple months ago, I was going to pick up an item I had agreed to purchase on Varagesale. Varagesale is an app that connects with Facebook and enables you to buy and sell stuff locally.

As I was walking up the outside stairs of this house, I thought I could detect a natural gas smell which usually means there is a leak nearby. It could come from a gas furnace or gas fireplace or gas appliances, etc. The mother of the girl who was selling the item answered the door and when I told her why I was there, she said she would get her daughter. I told this lady that I could smell gas and she should probably call our local gas company and have them come out and check. There is no cost for this and it’s for safety reasons. The lady either didn’t seem to really care or wasn’t comprehending what I was saying when I told her this. The daughter came out and we exchanged money and the shirt that I was buying and I left.

When I got back into my vehicle, I thought about what just happened and got the impression that the lady would not place the call so I took it upon myself to call the gas company. The person that answered my call was a bit surprised that I was calling about someone else’s property and not my own. But I explained to her that I am a Realtor and have smelt this a few times before when I had gone into properties and recognized this smell again. So this lady said they would look into this situation.

Very shortly after, I received a phone call from one of the employees of this gas company who said that he was outside this property and got a reading of 2 which he said was very high to get outside and it meant that the whole house was full of gas. He said that the people inside weren’t answering the door when they knocked and he didn’t even want to call them on the phone because that could set off an explosion. So I went back on Varagesale and messaged this person to answer her door and to get out of the house immediately as there was a gas leak and it was dangerous to be there.

She did message me later to say thanks. The gas employee also told me that I basically saved their lives by calling in the gas leak. I was both happy that no one was hurt and freaked out that something like this could have ended up in a tragedy.

So there, to all my friends and family that critique my use of Varagesale.  By using Varagesale, I saved 2 lives!

PS How do you detect a leak? Follow your senses!

Use your NOSE
SaskEnergy adds an odour to natural gas so you will quickly know if there’s a problem. If you smell an odour that is similar to skunk or rotten eggs, there may be a natural gas leak.

Use your EYES
You cannot see natural gas, however if you SEE a vapour, ground frosting, or a significant area of brown vegetation, that could be an indication of a natural gas leak. As well, if you SEE continuous bubbling of wet or flooded areas, or dust blowing from a hole in the ground during drier conditions, there may be a natural gas leak.

Use your EARS
If you HEAR a high-pitched hissing or roaring noise, there may be a natural gas leak.

TAKE ACTION!
If you suspect a leak indoors or outdoors:

  • Leave the home or area immediately
  • DO NOT use any electrical switches, appliances, telephones, motor vehicles, or any other sources of ignition such as lighters
    or matches
  • Call SaskEnergy’s 24-hour emergency line from a safe place
    1-888-7000-GAS (427)
  • DO NOT assume that the issue has already been reported or
    that someone else will call.

$25 Gas Detector Rebate

The most common way to detect a natural gas leak is using your sense of smell. The use of a gas detector is an additional and/or alternative safety measure for detecting a natural gas leak.

  • Most gas detectors also detect carbon monoxide. These detectors are appropriate for your home.
  • You may want to consider purchasing a second gas detector for your garage, keeping in mind that a carbon monoxide detector is not appropriate for a garage.
  • Smoke detectors do not detect natural gas.

If the warning alarm on your gas detector goes off, be sure to follow the same precautionary steps as indicated above – leave the area immediately and phone 1-888-7000-GAS (427).

Gas Detector Rebate Form

Gas Detector Rebate – Questions & Answers

How will SaskEnergy respond?

In the event of a natural gas emergency, SaskEnergy and local community response teams will:

  • Respond to the suspected site immediately
  • Assess the source of the problem and ensure the site is cleared of anyone whose safety may be at risk
  • Communicate and advise customers regarding a resolution plan

Saskatchewan Health Cards and Organ Donation

Thu, 05 Oct by Pauline Relkey

Did you recently get your renewal stickers and organ donation card in the mail?
You can sign up online to make any changes to your address, phone number, name, date of birth, marital status, death, birth, attending school out of province, extended vacation or absence from Sk of 7+ months.
change@HealthSask.ca
1-800-667-7551
2130 11th Ave, Regina, Sask.

Discuss organ donation with your loved ones so that they know of your wishes because they can say no, even if you signed this paper.

Every year, thousands of Canadians are added to organ wait lists. Although 1 donor can save up to 8 lives and benefit more than 75 people, hundreds of Canadians die each year waiting for an organ that never comes.

Spain has the highest organ donation rate in the world — 36 donors per million people in 2014. Today, Canada’s rate is half that — 18 donors per million people — and in the lower third of developed countries.  Even the United States is doing better that us, at 26 donors per million. Why are our numbers so low?

Expand the pool of potential donors
Find better ways of transporting organs.
Train doctors to be donation specialists.
Have a national organ donation registry
Become an organ donor and make your wishes known to family. Check out the Canadian Transplant Society for info about your End of Life Directive form http://www.cantransplant.ca/home/.

In January of 2015 the Van de Vorst family of 4 was killed in a collision near Saskatoon. Their donated organs helped more than 50 people. Through all the sadness and grief their remaining family had to endure, they still saw fit to donate their organs.  I think more of us need to sign up for organ donations. Let me know if at least one of you reading this does sign up.  It’ll make my day.  And yes I have signed up.

Safety Checklist

Wed, 09 Nov by Pauline Relkey

With winter soon approaching (at least not today with temps of 19 degrees), we might have a little more time to think about safety features in our homes.

Smoke detectors

Whether it is law or not, there should be smoke detectors in every building. Does every floor have a smoke detector? Are there additional ones in sleeping areas? Test the detectors regularly. Change batteries twice a year.

Carbon monoxide detectors

Do you have at least one carbon monoxide detector in your home? Test the detectors regularly.  Change batteries twice a year.

Home security

Do you have solid locks on doors and windows?   Outdoor light sensors?  Timed indoor lights?  Installed home alarm system?

Fire extinguishers

Its always a good idea to have 1 or 2 fire extinguishers in the home.  Have one in the kitchen (especially when I try to cook). Have another in the garage. Does everyone in the household know how to use them? Are they functional? Are they expired?

Safety education

Teach your family about the importance of home security and fire safety. Ensure they know how to use preventative safety equipment. Do they know how to call 911 in case of an emergency? Design and review an escape plan for all potential situations. If you live in a 2 storey home, do you have a collapsible ladder nearby?

fire-extinguisher

Saskatoon has an Emergency Notification Sign Up Program

Mon, 11 May by Pauline Relkey

Hopefully other cities will do the same soon.
Click here for more info.

emergency

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